The Unveiling

Sunday 12th August 2018 saw the long-awaited gathering for the ceremony to unveil the new gravestone for William Blake. Finding Blake was there - filming, interviewing speakers and participants and taking part in the moment of communal respect for and reflection of this great artist, poet and visionary and his legacy for us. Here, Linda Richardson looks back on the day, and James Murray-White shares his short film from the day.

It is a cool August day in Bunhill Field’s cemetery, and hundreds of people have gathered to watch the unveiling of William Blake’s new gravestone on the 191st anniversary of his death. The stone, cut by Lida Cardozo of the Kindersley Workshop in Cambridge, lies beneath a white cloth, and we assemble in a deep circle — people who continue to be inspired and changed by the life and work of this astonishing man. Vaulting above us in a green dome, plane trees create a dappled shade upon the human proceedings and we listen to the sparkling speeches of men and women to whom Blake is alive and galloping around in their conscious minds, enlightening and troubling this new generation of Blakeans.

The cameras are rolling and clicking as these modern-day experts capture the unfolding ceremony in all of its diversity. Speeches are made, the cloth is gently and slowly unfolded and there, at our feet lies a large slab of Portland stone

I give you the end of a golden string …

We all feel the privilege of being part of this holy gathering, each of us having internal speeches of our own.

Blake’s new gravestone unveiled
Photograph: Lida Cardozo Kindersley © 2018
www.kindersleyworkshop.co.uk

Later I watch Lida, apart from the crowds, circling her stone; the dust of it is in her blood from the months of intimate contact, and I wonder if she is saying ‘goodbye’, ‘farewell’, or if the intensity of her feelings are too complex to comprehend, and I remember another great Blakean woman, Patti Smith. A week earlier she had led us in a surprising rendition of We Three Kings of Orient Are, at the Cambridge Folk Festival, and called from her heart to us to be at peace with one another, to bring gifts of love to our troubled and turbulent world.

An unveiling and an awakening

On the train home with Malcolm Guite, one of the speakers at the unveiling, we talked about our delight in being at the ceremony, ‘astonishing’, he said. Malcolm is a prolific modern-day poet, priest and musician, and is tireless in his work of promoting kindness and compassion, and of awakening our minds to the power of imagination as the prime agent of human perception.

Here, then, is our short film showing the edited highlights of the speakers invited by the Blake Society to address the crowd at the unveiling ceremony at Bunhill Fields, London, on Sunday 12th August 2018. The speakers featured are: Tim Heath, Chairman of the Blake Society; writer and theologian Reverend Malcolm Guite; scholar & creator of Zoamorphosis, the Blake 2.0 Blog Jason Whittaker, Reverend Lucy Winkett of St James, Piccadilly; poet Stephen Micalef; lettercutter Lida Cardozo; rock musician Bruce Dickinson; and satirist and actor Will Franken. The film also shows the unveiling itself — by Carol and Luis Garrido, who discovered the exact location of Blake’s burial spot — and features part of the performance of the hymn Jerusalem by the vocal group, Blake.

Further material from the special day will appear here on Finding Blake & later in the final film. Watch this space!

Unveiling Ceremony – speakers from James Murray-White on Vimeo.

“... I rest not from my great task! To open the eternal worlds, to open the immortal eyes of man inwards into the worlds of thought, into eternity ever expanding in the bosom of God, the Human Imagination.”

Notes

Linda Richardson is an artist. Based in Cambridge, England, she makes work that engages the imagination and intuition and tries to make a creative space for the viewer to connect their inner nature with their outer nature to form ideas that are not rooted in convention, reason or rationality. However neither are they pure fantasy that provides an escape from humdrum life. Linda wants instead to awaken the senses to the beauty and wonder of the world in which we live, to activate the attention to the mystery of the human experience.

You can share many of the stages by which William Blake’s new gravestone has come to share its resting place with the man it commemorates:

  • Our films show how Lida Cardozo selected the block from the Jordans Mine quarry, the work of the quarry itself, and Lida’s careful and painstaking marking and cutting of the letters into the stone’s surface.
  • Our posts mark some of the encounters the Finding Blake team have had with the stone and the people who have brought it to its final state over that time.
  • Our timeline brings the whole experience into chronological order — up to the unveiling and beyond.

And of course, the life of the stone and of William Blake continue to resonate in the story that so many Blakeans who assembled on the 12th August, or who were there in spirit, will share with us on Finding Blake.

The story of how the site of William Blake’s exact burial spot came to be lost and then rediscovered by Blake admirers Carol and Luis Garrido is told in this excellent new piece by James Tapper in The Observer: “Finding it proved a bigger challenge than they imagined. Bunhill Fields was a cemetery popular with Dissenters, and when Blake died, largely unrecognised, in 1827, his was the fifth of eight coffins to be buried in the plot. The graveyard had been arranged in a grid, and the coordinates were in the Bunhill Fields burial records, given as ’77, east and west, 32, north and south’. But after bomb damage during the second world war, the Corporation of London decided to transform part of the site into gardens, leaving only two remaining gravestones, and moving Blake’s stone next to a memorial to an obelisk commemorating Daniel Defoe.”

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